Courses

There is a wide variety of urban studies courses for Yale College students to consider from departments and schools across the University.  If you are taking or teaching a course that should be listed here, or if you spot any inaccuracies or misclassifications, please contact elihu.rubin@yale.edu.  Cross-listed courses are organized here by their primary departmental classification with cross-listings noted in descriptions.    

If you would like a full listing of all courses click here.

BRST 220: London Metropolis

London as the model for the modern metropolis in literature and film. Dickens, T. S. Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Orwell, Elizabeth Bowen, Zadie Smith, and Amit Chaudhuri, read alongside film, television, city maps, and graphic design.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017

ENGL 212: Poetry of London

A study of London in poetry from the Middle Ages to the present, with attention to the interplay of form, genre, and tradition with the changing life of the metropolis.

Prerequisites: ENGL 125-126 or equivalent.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:15pm

MGT 536: Urban Poverty & Economic Development

TBD

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 1:00-2:20pm
African American Studies

AFAM 185: Harlem Renaissance

Study of the social, political, and aesthetic circumstances of the Harlem Renaissance, one of the most important periods in African American life. Focus on constitutive debates and key texts to better understand the origins and aims of the movement and its connection to formal politics and activism. Frequent use of relevant materials in Beinecke Library.

This course is cross-listed as ENGL 193.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 2:30-3:20pm

AFAM 469: Urban and Education Inequality

Analysis of contemporary policy problems related to academic under performance in lower income urban schools and the concomitant achievement gaps among various racial and ethnic groups in United States K-12 education. Historical review of opportunity inequalities and policy solutions proposed to ameliorate differences in achievement and job readiness. Students benefit from practical experience and interdisciplinary methods, including a lab component with time spent in a New Haven high school. 

Prerequisites: Any course offered by Education Studies, or one course in history or any social science, either: Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.  EDST 110 is preferred, although not required.

This class is cross-listed as ECON 171 and EDST 271.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:20am
American Studies

AMST 348: Space, Place, and Landscape

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 1:30-3:20pm

AMST 623: Working Group on Globalization & Culture

A continuing collective research project, a cultural studies “laboratory,” that has been running since the fall of 2003. The group, made up of graduate students and faculty from several disciplines, meets regularly to discuss common readings, to develop collective and individual research projects, and to present that research publicly. The general theme for the working group is globalization and culture, with three principal aspects: (1) the globalization of cultural industries and goods, and its consequences for patterns of everyday life as well as for forms of fiction, film, broadcasting, and music; (2) the trajectories of social movements and their relation to patterns of migration, the rise of global cities, the transformation of labor processes, and forms of ethnic, class, and gender conflict; (3) the emergence of and debates within transnational social and cultural theory. The specific focus, projects, and directions of the working group are determined by the interests, expertise, and ambitions of the members of the group, and change as its members change.

This course is cross-listed as CPLT 622.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday 1:30-3:20pm
Anthropology

ANTH 339: Urban Ethnography of Asia

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Thursday 9:25-11:15am

ANTH 375: Anthropology of Mobile Societies

The social and cultural significance of the ways that hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads, maritime traders, and members of our own society traverse space. The impact of mobility and transport technologies on subsistence, trade, interaction, and warfare from the first horse riders of five thousand years ago to jet-propulsion tourists of today. 

This course is cross-listed as ARCG 375 for undergraduate students. For graduate students, this course is listed as ANTH 779 and cross-listed as ARCG 779.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 3:30-5:20pm

ANTH 539: Urban Ethnographies of Asia

Introduction to the anthropological study of contemporary Asian cities. Focus on new ethnographies about cities in East, Southeast, and South Asia. Topics include rural-urban migration, redevelopment, evictions, social movements, land grabbing, master-planned developments, heritage preservation, utopian aspirations, social housing, slums and precariousness, and spatial cleansing.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Thursday 9:25-11:15am

ANTH 710: Settlement Patterns & Landscape

An introduction to the archaeological study of ancient settlements and landscapes. Topics include an overview of method and theory in settlement and landscape archaeology; field methods of reconnaissance, survey, and remote sensing; studies of households and communities; studies of ancient agricultural landscapes; regional patterns; roads and networks of communication; urbanism and ancient cities; and symbolic interpretations of ancient landscapes.

This course is cross-listed as ARCG 710.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday 9:25-11:15am
Architecture

ARCH 163: Environment, Energy, Building

An introduction to energy and environmental issues faced by the discipline of architecture. Global environmental issues, basic principles of energy generation and energy use, and fundamental climatic precursors and patterns. The complexity of developing solutions that address a wide range of local and global concerns. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 11:35-12:50pm

ARCH 261: History of Architecture II: 18th Century to Millenium

The second half of a two-term sequence in the history of architecture. Modern architecture and urbanism from the eighteenth century to the end of the twentieth. Genesis and meaning of architectural form, applying national, cultural, and international contexts.

This course is cross-listed as HSAR 325.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:20am

ARCH 345: Civic Art: Intro to Urban Design

Introduction to the history, analysis, and design of the urban landscape. Principles, processes, and contemporary theories of urban design; relationships between individual buildings, groups of buildings, and their larger physical and cultural contexts. Case studies from New Haven and other world cities. 

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 9:30-11:10am

ARCH 348: The Benevolent City

Cities as places of violence, vice, and irrelevance vs. cities as stages where humanity reaches its most elevated heights of self-realization and cultural production. Critical review of writing about cities to identify recurring arguments and value systems. The question of whether cities should be expected to convey benevolence on their inhabitants. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday 3:30-5:20pm

ARCH 431: Religion & Modern Architecture

The historical evolution of sacred building in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Relations between a building, its cultural environment, and its cult. The influence of religion in contemporary civic life as manifest in the design and construction of prominent religious buildings. Examination of mosques, synagogues, temples, and churches. Perspectives from philosophy, comparative religion, liturgical studies, and architectural theory and practice. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 9:00-10:15am
Ethnicity, Race and Migration

ER&M 217: Introduction to Latino/a Studies

Themes and issues that have shaped the experiences of Latino/a populations in the United States explored within an interdisciplinary and hemispheric framework. Relations between the United States and Latin America; the history of ethnic labels; the formation of transnational communities and identities; the politics of language and bilingualism; race, class, and ethnicity; and gender and sexuality.

This class is cross-listed as AMST 284.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: TBD

ER&M 311: Latina/o New Haven

Introduction to the field of Latina/o studies, with a focus on community-based research in New Haven. Training in interdisciplinary methods of social research, including oral history, interviews, archival research, cultural analysis, and social documentation. Students design collaborative research projects. 

This class is cross-listed as AMST 311.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday 1:30-3:20pm
Forestry & Environmental Studies

F&ES 888b: Urban Ecological Design and Landscape

In this course students from the School of Architecture and the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies investigate the ecological, social, and cultural factors that inform urban design. Teams, comprised of students from both disciplines, explore these factors through lectures, workshops, and field trips. They measure, record, and map out biological processes to see how these factors inform the built environment. By exploring ecological and social drivers that impact hydrology, microclimates, corridors, connectivity, and biodiversity, students will learn how these drivers interface with urbanized areas including public spaces, neighborhoods, and green infrastructure strategies. Using the model of designed experiments, teams craft effective and adaptable experiments to test, monitor and adapt urban design approaches for people and cities. Using current land-planning projects to connect with stakeholders and establish real-world strategies, students learn how to connect ecological science with site analysis and land-use planning and propose innovative strategies, from landscape architecture and urban ecology, for shaping and managing urban ecosystems. Limited enrollment. Alexander Felson

This course is cross-listed as ARCH 4226b.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30-4:20
History

HIST 131J: US Urban History 1870 to Present

NOTE: This is a Junior Seminar.

The history of work, leisure, consumption, and housing in American cities. Topics include immigration, formation and re-formation of ethnic communities, the segregation of cities along the lines of class and race, labor organizing, the impact of federal policy, the growth of suburbs, the War on Poverty and Reaganism, and post-Katrina New Orleans. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday 3:30-5:20pm

HIST 183: Asian American History 1800 to Present

An introduction to the history of East, South, and Southeast Asian migrations and settlement to the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. Major themes include labor migration, community formation, U.S. imperialism, legal exclusion, racial segregation, gender and sexuality, cultural representations, and political resistance. 

This course is cross-listed as AMST 272, ER&M 282, and WGSS 272.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday, Wednesday 10:30-11:20am

HIST 255J: London & Modernity 1880 to Present

Aspects of modernity and the changing character of London as a metropolitan center from the late nineteenth century to the present. Social and economic development of the city, urban cultures, historical geography, sexuality, and the imperial and postimperial metropolis.

 
Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: TBD

HIST 830: Cities, Media & Culture in 20th Century Africa

This seminar considers the scholarship on African urban life during the twentieth century. We read recent works about intellectual and cultural history, infrastructure and technology, political economy, urban planning, and media. In consultation with the instructor, students spend the last weeks of the course developing a study of a specific African city based on a mix of secondary literature and a dedicated primary source.

This course is cross-listed as AFST 830.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 1:30-3:20pm

HIST 835: Urbanism in African History

This course considers episodes in African history, from the deep past to the present. We consider archaeology and contested theories about pre-colonial urbanism, the rise of port cities and slaving entrepots, colonial urban design and planning, and unplanned urbanism in the wake of industrialization and the decline in agriculture. In addition to a range of scholarly works, we will consider digital humanities and the African city, music, art and urban leisure, read novels and memoirs and view a film.

Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Wednesday 1:30-3:20pm

HIST 913: Geography and History

NOTE: This course is only open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

A research seminar focused on methodological questions of geography and geographic analysis in historical scholarship. We consider approaches ranging from the Annales School of the early twentieth century to contemporary research in environmental history, history of science, urban history, and more. We also explore interdisciplinary work in social theory, historical geography, and anthropology and grapple with the promise (and drawbacks) of GIS. Students may write their research papers on any time period or geographic region, and no previous experience with geography or GIS is necessary.

This course is cross-listed as HSHM 713.

Course Type: Undergraduate, Course Type: Graduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday 1:30-3:20pm
History of Art

HSAR 115: Intro to the History of Art: Renaissance to Present

Painting, sculpture, and graphic arts, with some reference to architecture. Selected major works and artists treated in terms of form, function, and historical context. Introduction to visual analysis. Special attention to contact between Europe and its others.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 11:35-12:25pm

HSAR 216: American Decorative Arts in the 20th Century

A survey of American architecture and decorative arts in the twentieth century. Examination of architecture, furniture, metals, ceramics, and glass. Topics include responses to the reforms of the Arts and Crafts movement, the introduction of modernism, the survival and revival of traditional and vernacular expressions, the rise of industrial designers, the development of studio crafts, and the varieties of postmodern expression. 

This course is cross-listed as AMST 217.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:20am

HSAR 252: Roman Architecture

The great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Study of city planning and individual monuments and their decoration, including mural painting. Emphasis on developments in Rome, Pompeii, and central Italy; survey of architecture in the provinces. 

This course is cross-listed as CLCV 175 and ARCG 252.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 9:00-10:15am

HSAR 312: Modern Architecture 1890 to 1980

Architects, movements, and buildings central to the development of modern architecture from the late nineteenth century through the 1970s. Common threads and differing conceptions of modern architecture. The relationship of architecture to urban transformation; the formulation of new typologies; architects’ responses to new technologies and materials; changes in regimes of representation and media. Architects include Adolf Loos, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Louis Kahn. 

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 10:30-11:20am
Literature

LITR 296: Brazil's Modern Art Movement

A study of Brazilian modernism in literature and the arts, centered on S?o Paulo’s “Modern Art Week” of 1922 from the perspective of the European avant-gardes (cubism, futurism, surrealism). The Cannibal Manifesto and cultural independence from Europe; avant-garde practices in literature and the arts from the 1920s to the construction of Brasilia. 

Prerequisites: Reading knowledge of Portuguese and French helpful but not required.

This course is cross-listed as LAST 392 and PORT 392.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Monday 1:30-3:20pm
Political Science

PLSC 211: U.S. Social Policy & Inequality

The contours and consequences of inequality in the United States, including explanations for why it has expanded over the past several decades and why Americans seem to tolerate more of it. The development of the modern welfare state and the causes of racialized poverty, segregation, and incarceration.

This course is cross-listed as AFAM 325.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: Tuesday, Thursday 1:30-2:20pm

PLSC 280: Poverty & Politics in US Cities

Examination of how politics informs the formulation and implementation of policies to address urban poverty. Consideration of alternative explanations for poverty and alternative government strategies. Focus on efforts by local organizations and communities to improve their situations within the context of government actions. 

This course is cross-listed as AFAM 270.

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2017
Day/Time: TBA