Courses

There is a wide variety of urban studies courses for Yale College students to consider from departments and schools across the University.  If you are taking or teaching a course that should be listed here, or if you spot any inaccuracies or misclassifications, please contact elihu.rubin@yale.edu.  Cross-listed courses are organized here by their primary departmental classification with cross-listings noted in descriptions.    

African American Studies

AFAM 413b: Race, Sex, and Gender in Downtown New York City 1945 - 1984

Archivally-driven exploration of the post-war downtown scene in New York City. Particular attention to the intersections of jazz, nightlife, avant-garde performance, literature, and visual art, within the context of social movements for black and brown power and women’s and gay liberation.  HU

Professor: Tavia Nyong’o

(Cross-listed as AMST 448b, THST 420b & WGSS 415b)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: HTBA

AFAM 469b: Urban Inequalities and Educational Inequality

Analysis of contemporary policy problems related to academic under performance in lower income urban schools and the concomitant achievement gaps among various racial and ethnic groups in United States K-12 education. Historical review of opportunity inequalities and policy solutions proposed to ameliorate differences in achievement and job readiness. Students benefit from practical experience and interdisciplinary methods, including a lab component with time spent in a New Haven high school.  Prerequisites: Any course offered by Education Studies, or one course in history or any social science, either: Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology.  EDST 110 is preferred, although not required.  SO

Professor: Gerald Jaynes

(Cross-listed as ECON 171b & EDST 271b)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: HTBA
Anthropology

ANTH 371a/b: Anthropology of Mobile Societies

The social and cultural significance of the ways that hunter-gatherers, pastoral nomads, maritime traders, and members of our own society traverse space. The impact of mobility and transport technologies on subsistence, trade, interaction, and warfare from the first horse riders of five thousand years ago to jet-propulsion tourists of today.  SO

Professor: William Honeychurch

(Cross-listed as ARCG 375/ARCG 379)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2018, Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: HTBA

ANTH 414b: Hubs, Mobilities, and World Cities

Analysis of urban life in historical and contemporary societies. Topics include capitalist and postmodern transformations; class, gender, ethnicity, and migration; and global landscapes of power and citizenship.  SO  RP

Professor: Helen Siu

(Cross-listed as EAST 417b)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Architecture

ARCH 200b: Scales of Design

Exploration of architecture at multiple scales from the human to the world. Consideration of how design influences and shapes the material and conceptual spheres through four distinct subjects: the human, the building, the city, and the world. Examination of the role of architects, as designers, in constructing and shaping the inhabited world. Lectures, readings, reviews and four assignments that address the spatial and visual ramifications of design. Not open to first-year students. Required for all Architecture majors.  HU

Professor: Bimal Mendis

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Thursday, 11:30a.m. - 1:20p.m.

ARCH 280b: American Architecture and Urbanism

Introduction to the study of buildings, architects, architectural styles, and urban landscapes, viewed in their economic, political, social, and cultural contexts, from precolonial times to the present. Topics include: public and private investment in the built environment; the history of housing in America; the organization of architectural practice; race, gender, ethnicity and the right to the city; the social and political nature of city building; and the transnational nature of American architecture.  HU

Professor: Elihu Rubin

(Cross-listed as AMST 197b & HSAR 219b)

Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.

ARCH 341b: Globalization Space

Infrastructure space as a primary medium of change in global polity. Networks of trade, energy, communication, transportation, spatial products, finance, management, and labor, as well as new strains of political opportunity that reside within their spatial disposition. Case studies include free zones and automated ports around the world, satellite urbanism in South Asia, high-speed rail in Japan and the Middle East, agripoles in southern Spain, fiber optic submarine cable in East Africa, spatial products of tourism in North Korea, and management platforms of the International Organization for Standardization.  HU

Professor: Keller Easterling

(Cross-listed as GLBL 253b & LAST 318b)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Monday & Wednesday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.

ARCH 345a: Civic Art: Introduction to Urban Design

Introduction to the history, analysis, and design of the urban landscape. Principles, processes, and contemporary theories of urban design; relationships between individual buildings, groups of buildings, and their larger physical and cultural contexts. Case studies from New Haven and other world cities.  HU

Professor: Alan Plattus

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Wednesday, 9:30a.m. - 11:10a.m.

ARCH 360a: Urban Lab I: An Urban World

Understanding the urban environment through methods of research, spatial analysis, and diverse means of representation that address historical, social, political, and environmental issues that consider design at the scale of the entire world. Through timelines, maps, diagrams, collages and film, students frame a unique spatial problem and speculate on urbanization at the global scale.  Prerequisites: For non-majors: permission of the instructor is required. For ARCH majors: ARCH 150200, and 280.   HU  1½ Course cr

Professor: Staff

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 1:20p.m.

ARCH 362b: Urban Lab II: City Making

How architects represent, analyze, construct, and speculate on critical urban conditions as distinct approaches to city making. Investigation of a case study analyzing urban morphologies and the spatial systems of a city through diverse means of representation that address historical, social, political, and environmental issues. Through maps, diagrams, collages and text, students learn to understand spatial problems and project urban interventions. Prerequisites: For non-majors: permission of the instructor is required. For ARCH majors: ARCH 150200280, and 360.   1½ Course cr

Professor: Staff

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 1:20p.m.

ARCH 390a: Making Spaces

A project based course. Borrowing from practices of adaptive reuse and spatial design, students use design thinking methodologies to carefully research an existing place or site and develop possible interventions that consider not only the physical space but also its function and purpose within a community.  

Professor: Joseph Zinter

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.
Environmental Studies

EVST 234La: Field Science: Environment and Sustainability

A field course that explores the effects of human influences on the environment. Analysis of pattern and process in forested ecosystems; introduction to the principles of agroecology, including visits to local farms; evaluation of sustainability within an urban environment. Weekly field trips and one weekend field trip.  SC

Professor: L. Kealoha Freidenburg

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m. & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 5:00p.m.

EVST 290b: Geographic Information Systems

A practical introduction to the nature and use of geographic information systems (GIS) in environmental science and management. Applied techniques for the acquisition, creation, storage, management, visualization, animation, transformation, analysis, and synthesis of cartographic data in digital form.

Professor: Charles Tomlin

(Cross-listed as F&ES 290b)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday, 9:25a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
History

HIST 055b: A History of Modern London

Chronological and thematic exploration of modern London as a metropolitan and imperial center from the late-nineteenth-century to the present day. Topics include race, gay rights, women’s rights, consumer culture, the experience of war, and the development of a multi-racial society. The fashion, food, and popular music of London emerge as important components of the city’s global identity in the twentieth century. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Preregistration required; see under First-Year Seminar Program.  WRHU

Professor: Staff

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00p.m. - 2:15p.m.

HIST 150Ja: Healthcare for the Urban Poor

Exploration of the institutions, movements, and policies that have attempted to provide healthcare for the urban poor in America from the late nineteenth century to the present, with emphasis on the ideas (about health, cities, neighborhoods, poverty, race, gender, difference, etc) that shaped them. Topics include hospitals, health centers, public health programs, the medical civil rights movement, the women’s health movement, and national healthcare policies such as Medicare and Medicaid. 

Professor: Sakena Abedin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.

HIST 229Ja: London, 1560 - 1760

A study of London’s growth between 1560 and 1760 from a modest city of perhaps 50,000 people to a metropolis with over 700,000 inhabitants. Themes include the dynamics of growth; birth and death, with particular reference to the plague; migration; household life; villages within the city; London as the center of print culture; the royal court; polite society in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries; the “middle sort of people” and consumerism; the world of the poor; and vice and criminality. In September and in January, application for admission should be made directly to the instructors of the seminars, who will admit students to remaining vacancies in their seminars. Priority is given to applications from juniors, then seniors, majoring in History, but applications are also accepted from qualified sophomores and from students majoring in other disciplines or programs. Seminars on the history of the United States or Canada are numbered 100J to 199J; seminars on Britain and Europe are 200J to 299J; and seminars numbered 300J to 399J cover the rest of the world. Seminars numbered in the 400s address global topics; students must apply to the director of undergraduate studies in History to count a 400-level seminar toward a particular geographical distribution category.  WRHU

Professor: Ketih Wrightson

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Wednesday, 1:30pm. - 3:20p.m.
History of Art

HSAR 252a: Roman Architecture

The great buildings and engineering marvels of Rome and its empire. Study of city planning and individual monuments and their decoration, including mural painting. Emphasis on developments in Rome, Pompeii, and central Italy; survey of architecture in the provinces.  HU

Professor: Diana Kleiner

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 9:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.

HSAR 312b: Modern Architecture, 1890-1980

Architects, movements, and buildings central to the development of modern architecture from the late nineteenth century through the 1970s. Common threads and differing conceptions of modern architecture. The relationship of architecture to urban transformation; the formulation of new typologies; architects’ responses to new technologies and materials; changes in regimes of representation and media. Architects include Adolf Loos, Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Louis Kahn.  HU
 

Professor: Craig Buckley

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 10:30a.m. - 11:20a.m.

HSAR 459a: Contested Monuments

Following the events in Charlottesville last year, and the national discussions and actions regarding Confederate monuments that followed, this course examines issues surrounding the agency of art in pubic spaces, race and representation, memory and memorialization. We examine the legal, ethical, and political questions raised by these sculptures and their sites while also considering a longer history of controversial public monuments.  HU

Professor: Jennifer Raab

(Cross-listed as ER&M 459)

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Fall 2018
Day/Time: Wednesday 9:25a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Humanities

HUMS 444b: The City of Rome

An interdisciplinary study of Rome from its legendary origins through its evolving presence at the crossroads of Europe and the world. Exploration of the city’s rich interweaving of history, theology, literature, philosophy, and the arts in significant moments of Roman and world history.  HU

Professor: Virginia Jewiss

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday & Thursday, 11:35a.m. - 12:50p.m.
Political Science

PLSC 274a: Cities: Making Public Choices in New Haven

Examination of cities, particularly the relationship of people to place and most importantly to one another, through the prism and experiences of the City of New Haven. Exploration of how concepts of social capital and legitimacy of institutions in policy design and execution, are key to the well being of community residents. How cities, in the context of retreating or antagonistic strategies by the state and  federal governments, can be key platforms for future economic and social wealth creation.  SO

Professor: John DeStefano

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Wednesday 9:25a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
Sociology

SOCY 396b: Cities, Suburbs, and School Choice

The changing dynamic between cities and suburbs and the role of individuals and institutions in promoting desegregation or perpetuating segregation since the mid-twentieth century. The government’s role in the expansion of suburbs; desegregating schools; the rise of school choice through magnets and charters; the effects of inner-ring suburban desegregation and of urban gentrification on the landscape of education reform. Recommended preparation: EDST 110. Preference to Education Studies Scholars.  SO  RP

Professor: Staff

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Thursday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.
Study of the City

STCY 176b/ARCH 230b: Introduction to Study of the City

An examination of forces shaping American cities and strategies for dealing with them. Topics include housing, commercial development, parks, zoning, urban renewal, landmark preservation, new towns, and suburbs. The course includes games, simulated problems, fieldwork, lectures, and discussion.  SO

Professor: Alexander Garvin

Course Type: Undergraduate
Term: Spring 2019
Day/Time: Tuesday, 1:30p.m. - 3:20p.m.